Topic: Hobbies

So, you need to sell something. 0





So, you need to sell something.

OK, so, you’re finally getting around to all that fall/spring cleaning that you told yourself for the last several life times that you were going to do.
Now, you have a pile of stuff you need to get rid of, but you think there’s a few buck$ in it and you don’t want to throw it out.
What to do? Well, here’s a few ideas to consider:
eBay and Craigslist: Granted you will pay a fee and you may want to give serious consideration to meeting the prospective buyers in a neutral location like post office parking lot of police station, but eveyone knows they exist and looks there.
5Miles (www.5miles.com): In theory they attempt to weed out potential theives and you should be able to verify the potential buyers by phone, facebook, etc. By the way, ALWAYS use your cell phone – NEVER use your land line.
Varagesale (www.varagesale.com): Safety is a primary priority on this site and buyers and sellers contact each other via facebook prior to meeting.
Poshmark (www.poshmark.com): Touts itself as the venu to buy and sell fashion. Be careful for the fees they charge and like all sites, make sure you read the fine print before using them.
The Trove Market Place (www.usetrove.com): If you want to unload things like furniture, artwork, antiques, etc., then this may be a place to look at. They charge a fee for using credit cards and you, like Amazon, you have a way of reviewing the seller’s ratings before buying.
Amazon (www.amazon.com): If you can’t find it or sell it on amazon, it doesn’t exit. It’s an easy place to unload books or if you want to start an online junk store then you’ve possibly found your nirvana.
Kiiboo (www.kiiboo.com): you can find more tech centric items here. Also, cameras, laptops, and other things many of which you’d find on ebay, amazon, craigslist, etc. It’s always nice to have options.
As always, buyer and seller beware. There’s a crook born every minute and it’s up to you to protect yourself and your best interests.
Good luck and good shopping…

I’m Don Rima and that’s the view From Where I Stand…



Time To Spring clean your smart phone 0








Time To Spring clean your smart phone
OK, so, when you’re making your spring cleaning list it’s important to add your cell phone to it. Face it, through
the year’s worth of use your phone’s memory is full, apps are running slower, so it’s time to refresh that phone and clean/tune it up a bit.
Here’s a few ideas:
Make sure it’s backed up
Check your phone’s manual or just google for your phone type and backup. You can backup to the cloud (if you trust it) or to you local PC. Connect and follow the instructions and away you go. Do this first to avoid losing anything that may be of some importance. Actually, you should be doing this periodically anyway.
Delete unused apps
If you’re not using them, you don’t need them. And, you could use the memory for something else.
Close all open apps
Open apps take memory. They also reduce performance on your phone. Frankly, you should periodically be closing all your open apps anyway and periodically doing a power cycle (off/on) of your phone just to give it the chance to clean up its act.
Make sure your apps are up to date
Chances are you’ve been hounded by your phone already about apps needing updating, but you could be like many folks that just don’t update their apps…and since some apps need connection to a higher speed source (wifi, etc) you may have had to delay doing your updates. Do it now. If you’re low on memory you may have to stagger the updates and do only a few at a time.
Frankly, it’s best to keep current on your apps. What I like to do is open my app update icon, then select update all. I generally do this in the evening before hitting the shower or pillow…and when I get up everything is generally updated, charged and ready to go.
Transfer your pictures, etc
OK, so you’ve been using your phone as a camera and a repository for all kinds of pictures, documents and
whatever your needs are. It’s time to move them off the phone and onto some form of external storage. This can be your PC, cloud(if you trust it), or whatever devices work best for you. The process varies by phone type but generally just plug your phone into the USB port of your PC and follow the software/manufacturer’s instructions and you’re gold.
Delete old emails and text message
Again, if you don’t need it, don’t keep it. Memory on a cell phone is expensive. And, chances are that ping you did to the friend you’ve not seen since 3rd grade isn’t a high priority item to be keeping.
Delete old histories
Many of your apps, especially your internet browswers, are potentially keeping massive amounts of historical data that not only do you not need to keep having around, you may not want some others knowing it’s out there. So, delete it. The methods will vary based on the apps…but start with your internet browsers, etc., and work from there. Frankly you should be doing this periodically anyway as these apps and their history logs are generally just a waste of space.
Give it an external wipe down
OK, you’ve cleaned up the insides, now it’s time to clean up the outside. Over short periods of time you’d be surprised how much stuff gets in the cracks of your phone…all kinds of bugs, viruses, bacteria, etc., and frankly, you don’t need to be exposing yourself to that kinda stuff every day anyway. Again, this is something that you really should be considering doing periodically. Don’t soak your phone in a solution as this will trash your phone and your warranty, but a damp cloth carefully used will work wonders!
Good luck and safe phoning!
I’m Don Rima and that’s the view From Where I Stand.



FCC Frequency Allocations for Amateurs – aka Hams 3







FCC Frequency Allocations for Amateurs – aka Hams

One of annoying things about life is the “use it or lose it” properties. If you don’t use it, you tend to lose it. Generally this applies to things learned or perhaps memorized at one time.
I used to be semi-fluent in several languages – even translated for my parents when we traveled as I picked it up faster than they did. I also lost it faster than they did.
When I got my Amateur Radio (Ham) license I tried to remember all the frequencies I could play on and what I was allowed to do on them, and NOT to do on them. Frankly, I gave up.
To make life easier for me I consolidated a few frequency lists from good Ham sources and reorganized them into a form that I could use alot easier. I broke it down by license class then frequency
and frequency use restrictions.
Here it is in order of license class progression. Just print and take a pair of scissors and chop off what’s not relevant to you and tack it up in your ham shack. If you see any fat fingers or if the laws change and I’ve not caught it, please let me know for an update.
Enjoy.
NOVICE:
80 Meters
3.525-3.600 MHz: CW Only
40 Meters
7.025-7.125 MHz : CW only
15 Meters
21.025-21.200 MHz: CW Only
10 Meters
28.000-28.300 MHz: CW, RTTY/Data–Maximum power 200 watts PEP
28.300-28.500 MHz: CW, Phone–Maximum power 200 watts PEP
1.25 Meters – limited to 25 watts PEP output
222.00-225.00 MHz: CW, Phone, Image, MCW, RTTY/Data
23 Centimeters
1270-1295 MHz: CW, phone, Image, MCW, RTTY/Data (maximum power, 5 watts PEP)
TECHNICIAN:
80 Meters
3.525-3.600 MHz: CW Only
40 Meters
7.025-7.125 MHz : CW only
15 Meters
21.025-21.200 MHz: CW Only
10 Meters
28.000-28.300 MHz: CW, RTTY/Data–Maximum power 200 watts PEP
28.300-28.500 MHz: CW, Phone–Maximum power 200 watts PEP
6 Meters
50.0-50.1 MHz: CW Only
50.1-54.0 MHz: CW, Phone, Image, MCW, RTTY/Data
2 Meters
144.0-144.1 MHz: CW Only
144.1-148.0 MHz: CW, Phone, Image, MCW, RTTY/Data
1.25 Meters
222.00-225.00 MHz: CW, Phone, Image, MCW, RTTY/Data
70 Centimeters
420.0-450.0 MHz: CW, Phone, Image, MCW, RTTY/Data
33 Centimeters
902.0-928.0 MHz: CW, Phone, Image, MCW, RTTY/Data
23 Centimeters
1240-1300 MHz: CW, Phone, Image, MCW, RTTY/Data
 
Higher Frequencies:
2300-2310 MHz
2390-2450 MHz
3300-3500 MHz
5650-5925 MHz
10.0-10.5 GHz
24.0-24.25 GHz
47.0-47.2 GHz
76.0-81.0 GHz – Amateur operation at 76-77 GHz has been suspended
122.25 -123.00 GHz
134-141 GHz
241-250 GHz
All above 300 GHz
GENERAL:
160 Meters
1.800-2.000 MHz: CW, Phone, Image, RTTY/Data
80 Meters
3.525-3.600 MHz: CW, RTTY/Data
3.800-4.000 MHz: CW, Phone, Image
60 Meters – 100w ERP
5330.5 Khz – USB phone1 and CW/RTTY/data
5346.5 Khz – USB phone1 and CW/RTTY/data
5357.0 Khz – USB phone1 and CW/RTTY/data
5371.5 Khz – USB phone1 and CW/RTTY/data
5403.5 Khz – USB phone1 and CW/RTTY/data
Amateurs are permitted to operate on five frequency channels, each having an
effective bandwidth of 2.8 kHz.
These frequencies are available for use by stations having a control
operator holding a General, Advanced or Amateur Extra class license. It is
important to note that the frequencies shown above are suppressed carrier
frequencies – the frequencies that appear in your transceiver’s tuning
display when your transceiver is in the USB mode.
Amateurs may transmit with an effective radiated power of 100 W or less,
relative to a half-wave dipole. If you’re using a commercial directional
antenna, FCC Rules require you to keep a copy of the manufacturer’s gain
specifications in your station records. If you built the directional antenna
yourself, you must calculate the gain and keep the results in your station
records.
40 Meters
7.025-7.125 MHz : CW, RTTY/Data
7.175-7.300 MHz:: CW, Phone, Image
30 Meters – Maximum power, 200 watts PEP
10.100-10.150 MHz: CW, RTTY/Data
20 Meters
14.025 -14.150 MHz CW, RTTY/Data
14.225 -14.350 MHz: CW, Phone, Image
17 Meters
18.068-18.110 MHz: CW, RTTY/Data
18.110-18.168 MHz: CW, Phone, Image
15 Meters
21.025-21.200 MHz: CW, RTTY/Data
21.275-21.450 MHz: CW, Phone, Image
12 Meters
 4.890-24.930 MHz: CW, RTTY/Data
24.930-24.990 MHz: CW, Phone, Image
10 Meters
28.000-28.300 MHz: CW, RTTY/Data
28.300-29.700 MHz: CW, Phone, Image
6 Meters
50.0-50.1 MHz: CW Only
50.1-54.0 MHz: CW, Phone, Image, MCW, RTTY/Data
2 Meters
144.0-144.1 MHz: CW Only
144.1-148.0 MHz: CW, Phone, Image, MCW, RTTY/Data
 
1.25 Meters
219-220 MHz amateur use on a secondary basis.
222.00-225.00 MHz: CW, Phone, Image, MCW, RTTY/Data
70 Centimeters
420.0-450.0 MHz: CW, Phone, Image, MCW, RTTY/Data
33 Centimeters
902.0-928.0 MHz: CW, Phone, Image, MCW, RTTY/Data
23 Centimeters
1240-1300 MHz: CW, Phone, Image, MCW, RTTY/Data
 
Higher Frequencies:
2300-2310 MHz
2390-2450 MHz
3300-3500 MHz
5650-5925 MHz
10.0-10.5 GHz
24.0-24.25 GHz
47.0-47.2 GHz
76.0-81.0 GHz – 76-77 GHz has been suspended
122.25 -123.00 GHz
134-141 GHz
241-250 GHz
All above 300 GHz
ADVANCED CLASS:
160 Meters
1.800-2.000 MHz: CW, Phone, Image, RTTY/Data
80 Meters
3.525-3.600 MHz: CW, RTTY/Data
3.700-4.000 MHz: CW, Phone, Image
60 Meters – 100w ERP
5330.5 Khz – USB phone1 and CW/RTTY/data
5346.5 Khz – USB phone1 and CW/RTTY/data
5357.0 Khz – USB phone1 and CW/RTTY/data
5371.5 Khz – USB phone1 and CW/RTTY/data
5403.5 Khz – USB phone1 and CW/RTTY/data
Amateurs are permitted to operate on five frequency channels, each having an
effective bandwidth of 2.8 kHz.
These frequencies are available for use by stations having a control
operator holding a General, Advanced or Amateur Extra class license. It is
important to note that the frequencies shown above are suppressed carrier
frequencies – the frequencies that appear in your transceiver’s tuning
display when your transceiver is in the USB mode.
Amateurs may transmit with an effective radiated power of 100 W or less,
relative to a half-wave dipole. If you’re using a commercial directional
antenna, FCC Rules require you to keep a copy of the manufacturer’s gain
specifications in your station records. If you built the directional antenna
yourself, you must calculate the gain and keep the results in your station
records.
40 Meters
7.025-7.125 MHz : CW, RTTY/Data
7.125-7.300 MHz:: CW, Phone, Image
30 Meters – Maximum power, 200 watts PEP
10.100-10.150 MHz: CW, RTTY/Data
20 Meters
14.025 -14.150 MHz CW, RTTY/Data
14.175 -14.350 MHz: CW, Phone, Image
 
17 Meters
18.068-18.110 MHz: CW, RTTY/Data
18.110-18.168 MHz: CW, Phone, Image
15 Meters
21.025-21.200 MHz: CW, RTTY/Data
21.225-21.450 MHz: CW, Phone, Image
12 Meters
24.890-24.930 MHz: CW, RTTY/Data
24.930-24.990 MHz: CW, Phone, Image
10 Meters
28.000-28.300 MHz: CW, RTTY/Data
28.300-29.700 MHz: CW, Phone, Image
6 Meters
50.0-50.1 MHz: CW Only
50.1-54.0 MHz: CW, Phone, Image, MCW, RTTY/Data
2 Meters
144.0-144.1 MHz: CW Only
144.1-148.0 MHz: CW, Phone, Image, MCW, RTTY/Data
 
1.25 Meters
219-220 MHz to amateur use on a secondary basis.
222.00-225.00 MHz: CW, Phone, Image, MCW, RTTY/Data
70 Centimeters
420.0-450.0 MHz: CW, Phone, Image, MCW, RTTY/Data
33 Centimeters
902.0-928.0 MHz: CW, Phone, Image, MCW, RTTY/Data
23 Centimeters
1240-1300 MHz: CW, Phone, Image, MCW, RTTY/Data
 
Higher Frequencies:
2300-2310 MHz
2390-2450 MHz
3300-3500 MHz
5650-5925 MHz
10.0-10.5 GHz
24.0-24.25 GHz
47.0-47.2 GHz
76.0-81.0 GHz – 76-77 GHz has been suspended
122.25 -123.00 GHz
134-141 GHz
241-250 GHz
All above 300 GHz
AMATEUR EXTRA CLASS:
160 Meters
1.800-2.000 MHz: CW, Phone, Image, RTTY/Data
 
80 Meters
3.500-3.600 MHz: CW, RTTY/Data
3.600-4.000 MHz: CW, Phone, Image
60 Meters – 100w ERP
5330.5 Khz – USB phone1 and CW/RTTY/data
5346.5 Khz – USB phone1 and CW/RTTY/data
5357.0 Khz – USB phone1 and CW/RTTY/data
5371.5 Khz – USB phone1 and CW/RTTY/data
5403.5 Khz – USB phone1 and CW/RTTY/data
Amateurs are permitted to operate on five frequency channels, each having an
effective bandwidth of 2.8 kHz.
These frequencies are available for use by stations having a control
operator holding a General, Advanced or Amateur Extra class license. It is
important to note that the frequencies shown above are suppressed carrier
frequencies – the frequencies that appear in your transceiver’s tuning
display when your transceiver is in the USB mode.
Amateurs may transmit with an effective radiated power of 100 W or less,
relative to a half-wave dipole. If you’re using a commercial directional
antenna, FCC Rules require you to keep a copy of the manufacturer’s gain
specifications in your station records. If you built the directional antenna
yourself, you must calculate the gain and keep the results in your station
records.
 
40 Meters
7.000-7.125 MHz : CW, RTTY/Data
7.125-7.300 MHz:: CW, Phone, Image
30 Meters – 200 watts PEP.
10.100-10.150 MHz: CW, RTTY/Data
 
20 Meters
14.000 – 14.150 MHz CW, RTTY/Data
14.150 -14.350 MHz: CW, Phone, Image
 
17 Meters
18.068-18.110 MHz: CW, RTTY/Data
18.110-18.168 MHz: CW, Phone, Image
15 Meters
21.000-21.200 MHz: CW, RTTY/Data
21.200-21.450 MHz: CW, Phone, Image
12 Meters
24.890-24.930 MHz: CW, RTTY/Data
24.930-24.990 MHz: CW, Phone, Image
10 Meters
28.000-28.300 MHz: CW, RTTY/Data
28.300-29.700 MHz: CW, Phone, Image
6 Meters
50.0-50.1 MHz: CW Only
50.1-54.0 MHz: CW, Phone, Image, MCW, RTTY/Data
2 Meters
144.0-144.1 MHz: CW Only
144.1-148.0 MHz: CW, Phone, Image, MCW, RTTY/Data
 
1.25 Meters
219-220 MHz to amateur use on a secondary basis.
222.00-225.00 MHz: CW, Phone, Image, MCW, RTTY/Data
70 Centimeters
420.0-450.0 MHz: CW, Phone, Image, MCW, RTTY/Data
33 Centimeters
902.0-928.0 MHz: CW, Phone, Image, MCW, RTTY/Data
23 Centimeters
1240-1300 MHz: CW, Phone, Image, MCW, RTTY/Data
 
Higher Frequencies:
2300-2310 MHz
2390-2450 MHz
3300-3500 MHz
5650-5925 MHz
10.0-10.5 GHz
24.0-24.25 GHz
47.0-47.2 GHz
76.0-81.0 GHz – 76-77 GHz has been suspended
122.25 -123.00 GHz
134-141 GHz
241-250 GHz
All above 300 GHz
73 🙂
I’m Don Rima and that’s the way I see it, from where I stand…